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EYE DEVELOPMENT & DEGENERATION: From Genes to Therapy


MRC HUMAN GENETICS UNIT

EDINBURGH, UK

September 4-5, 2017

 

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EYE DEVELOPMENT & DEGENERATION: From Genes to Therapy


MRC HUMAN GENETICS UNIT

EDINBURGH, UK

September 4-5, 2017

 

 

From Basic Eye research to emerging therapies

The MRC Human Genetics Unit hosted a two-day scientific meeting highlighting the exciting advances in eye development, physiology, disease and therapeutics. This event also marked the outstanding contribution of Professor Alan Wright to the field of eye disease genetics over the last 25 years as well highlighting emerging vision research projects his work helped foster.

This multidisciplinary event dedicated to advancing the field of ophthalmic genetics, disease modelling and emerging therapeutics attracted both basic researchers and clinicians interested in the changing face of human eye disease.

Topics included: 

 
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EYE DEVELOPMENT & DEGENERATION


From models of human disease to emerging gene therapeutics, this

meeting covered exciting basic through translational vision research.

EYE DEVELOPMENT & DEGENERATION


From models of human disease to emerging gene therapeutics, this

meeting covered exciting basic through translational vision research.

We had an exciting line-up of international speakers for this two day multidisciplinary meeting with sessions in Developmental Genetics, Quantitative Traits, Mechanisms of Eye Disease, as well as Therapeutic Approaches to Genetic Eye Disease. Speakers included Ruth Ashery-Padan (Tel-Aviv University, Israel), Sam G. Jacobson (University of Pennsylvania, USA), Graeme Black (University of Manchester, UK), Tony Moore (University of California, San Fransisco, USA), Caroline Klaver (Eramus Medical Centre, Netherlands), Robin Ali (University College London, UK) and Eberhart Zrenner (Institute for Ophthalmic Research, University of Tübingen, Germany).

We also had selected a few four talks from submitted poster abstracts, as well as had two excellent poster sessions. Congratulations to from graduate student Yingdi Chen from the University of Newcastle upon Tyneside whose poster "The role of microglial activation in the photoreceptor survival in a mouse model of retinal degeneration" won the Alan Wright poster prize. Congratulations Yingdi!

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Alan Wright


Alan Wright


 
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It all started when...

Alan Wright is a scholarly scientist who has had a major influence on the fields of human eye genetics and degeneration. This started with his groundbreaking study identifying RPGR as the gene mutated in the most common X-linked form of retinal degeneration . Further investigation of the RPGR pathway led Alan and colleagues to implicate ciliary dysfunction as a cause of retinal degeneration, one of the pioneering contributions to the burgeoning field of ciliary genetics . If this were not enough, Alan conceived and set up the MRC HGU's very successful quantitative genetics programmes in the isolated populations of Croatia, extended with Jim Wilson to the populations of Orkney and Shetland . These studies have provided insights into the genetic architecture and pathways underlying numerous traits including those relevant to the eye . Alan has had an enormous influence on the science in the MRC HGU and has been a supportive mentor to many students, postdoctoral fellows and other PIs throughout his career. This special event will mark Alan's outstanding contribution to the field of eye disease genetics over the past 25 years, as well as highlight emerging vision projects his work has helped foster.

 
 
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